Publications

Total Documents: 4

 

UK implementation and ratification of the UPC Agreement

Document No: PUB 20K/15 Posted: 04 March 2016

In summer 2014 the IPO consulted on proposed secondary legislation, namely a statutory instrument (SI), to implement the UPC Agreement into UK domestic legislation. The IP Fed­eration responded to that consultation (see Policy Paper 9/14), providing general com­ments in three key areas, namely (1) Jurisdiction (UK alignment, transitional provisions, IPO Opinions service), (2) Unitary Patent (threats and double patenting), and (3) Infringement Exceptions (specifically software interoperability, Article 27(k) UPCA).

 

 

Unregistered Design Rights – Qualification

Document No: PUB 20N/13 Posted: 23 December 2013

Unregistered Design Right (UDR) was introduced by the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988. This sui generis right was created as a means of providing protection for purely functional designs which were first embodied in a design document or an actual article on or after 1 August 1989. 

Update on “plain” (more accurately, “standardised”) packaging

Document No: PUB 20K/12 Posted: 08 March 2013

This trade mark issue has received much attention in the Press, although it is not one on which the Federation has taken a position.

The damage to health caused by smoking is of concern to governments. It is obviously quite impractical for most governments to ban tobacco products (a point of legal consequence discussed below). However, governments do interfere with the way tobacco products are marketed to the general public in the hope of reducing consumption. In England, supermarkets no longer display the packets of tobacco products openly; they are behind a screen, so that customers have to know what to ask for. And in many countries, the packets bear health warnings, some including shocking medical pictures.

Unintentional Infringement of UK and Community Rights

Document No: PUB 6/11 Posted: 13 February 2012
In December 2010, the IPO launched a consultation asking interested parties what they con­sidered was the best way of removing an anomaly in the law protecting designs.